20th Century: 1970

The Unix time, aka Epoch time, is set to start on January 1, 1970.

The Network Control Program (NCP) provided the middle layers of the protocol stack running on host computers of the ARPANET, the predecessor to the modern Internet.

NCP preceded the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) is a transport layer protocol used during the early ARPANET. NCP was a simplex protocol that utilized two port addresses, establishing two connections for two-way communications. An odd and an even port were reserved for each application layer application or protocol. The standardization of TCP and UDP reduced the need for the use of two simplex ports for each application down to one duplex port. Stephen D. Crocker, then a graduate student at UCLA, formed and led the Network Working Group (NWG) and specifically led the development of NCP. Other participants in the NWG developed application-level protocols such as TELNET, FTP, SMTP, among others.

Intel released its first commercially available DRAM, the Intel 1103 in October 1970. Capable of storing 1024 bytes or 1 KB of memory.

The Intel 4004, developed in 1970, is a 4-bit central processing unit (CPU) released by Intel Corporation in 1971. It was the first commercially produced microprocessor and the first in a long line of Intel CPUs.

Intel 4004 CPU – Thomas Nguyen / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)

The first dot-matrix impact printer was developed by Centronics in 1970.

IBM introduced the System/370 that included the use of Virtual Memory and utilized memory chips instead of magnetic core technology.

Douglas Engelbart got a patent for the first computer mouse on November 17, 1970.

SRI_Computer_Mouse
SRI International / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)

Philips introduced the VCR in 1970.

Henry Edward Roberts establishes Micro Instrumentation and Telemetry Systems (MITS) in 1970.

Western Digital was founded.

1970: The first broadcast of The Mary Tyler Moore Show, The Odd Couple, Monday Night Football and All My Children; Advert Smash Martians; PBS is launched.

Apollo 13: “Houston, We’ve Got A Problem.”

This video contains historical footage of the flight of Apollo-13, the fifth Lunar Mission, and the third spacecraft that was to land on the Moon. Apollo-13’s launch date was April 11, 1970. On the 13th of April, after docking with the Lunar Module, the astronauts, Jim Lovell, Fred Haise, and Jack Swigert, discovered that their oxygen tanks had ruptured and ended up entering and returning to Earth in the Lunar Module instead of the Command Module. There is footage of inside module and Mission Control shots, personal commentary by the astronauts concerning the problems as they developed, national news footage and commentary, and a post-flight Presidential Address by President Richard Nixon.