20th Century: 1971

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DND beginnings. Let us discuss this book. By Source (WP: NFCC#4), Fair use.

Gygax and Perren’s set of medieval miniatures rules from the Castle & Crusade Society newsletter The Domesday Book brought Gygax to the attention of Guidon Games, who hired him to produce a “Wargaming with Miniatures” series of games. Towards the end of 1970, Gygax worked with Don Lowry to develop the first three products for the new Guidon Games wargames line. Among the three was a pamphlet of medieval rules entitled Chainmail which adopted much of the medieval rules published in the Domesday Book. Late in the development process, Gygax added to the end of Chainmail fourteen pages of a “Fantasy Supplement” which detailed the behavior of Heroes, Wizards, dragons, elves, and various other fantastic creatures and people.

The first edition Chainmail saw print in March 1971. It quickly became Guidon Games’ biggest hit, selling one hundred copies per month. A second edition would follow in July 1972, with several expansions and revisions to the original game. The January 1972 issue of the International Wargamer initially published the most significant of these changes, including the splitting of the “Wizard” type into four distinct levels of spell casters.

IBM shipped the first units of Noble’s solution, the 23 FD “Minnow” in 1971. The 8-inch floppy disk drive with removable read-only, flexible “memory disks” offered a storage capacity of 80 kilobytes (KB), approximately 3,000 punched cards.

While at Intel, Dov Frohman invented and patented (#3,660,819) the EPROM in 1971.

Ray Tomlinson sends the first e-mail, the first messaging system to send messages across a network to other users.

The computer gets a voice, IBM introduces its first speech recognition program capable of recognizing about 5,000 words.

FTP was first purposed on April 16, 1971, by Abhay Bhushan of MIT in RFC 114.

Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dabney created the first arcade game called “Computer Space” in 1971.

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Computer Space is a space combat arcade game developed in 1971. Created by Nolan Bushnell and Ted Dabney in partnership as Syzygy Engineering, it was the first arcade video game as well as the first commercially available video game.

The First edition of Unix released on November 3, 1971.

Bob Bemer published the world’s first warning on the Year 2000 problem in 1971.

Intel introduced the first microprocessor, the Intel 4004 on November 15, 1971. The 4004 had 2,300 transistors, performed 60,000 operations per second (OPS), addressed 640 bytes of memory, and cost $200.00.

Intel 4004 – Thomas Nguyen / CC BY-SA (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)